Thread: Tit-Wagon
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Old 03-18-2017, 06:37 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Australia
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Next weekend a group of guys from Sydney will be meeting the local crew and myself for a quick coffee and catch up. From there, I'll be leading that crew down to Melbourne to meet up with more P-Car owners as we prepare to board the ferry to Tasmania. In total, there'll be 15 of us spending a week on the Island driving a good portion of the Targa Tasmania stages.

I've done this before, in late 2015, and it's a good excuse to get some upgrade and maintenance items done before we leave.

Suspension

Namely, finally get some refreshed suspension in the car!

I’m a KW fanboy, and admittedly didn’t really consider any alternatives. I’ve had KW in two of my other cars and love the product. For this car, I went with V1’s because I know I’ll never really fiddle with the rebound and compression settings once the car is set. I’ve also got a set of Rennline camber-plates and a carbon strut-brace to top it all off in the front end.

Now, when I was doing my research, some things weren’t clear to me - such as - I’d read that the KW V1’s and V3’s for the early 964’s (pre ’92) come with mono-ball top-mounts on the rear struts.

Guess what; they do! Bonus!

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Click the image to open in full size.

So that saved the expensive of buying additional mono-ball top-mounts for the rear. :thumbup:

Now. Some of you might wonder about NVH with mono-balls in a street car. For me, this is a fun weekend car and I’m fine with that risk. Also, the top-mount bushings were pretty old in my car, so they needed replacing either way.

The Products

Rennline Mono-ball top-mounts and Camber-plates:

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KW V1’s

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Sorry - didn’t get a pre-install photo of the strut brace.

The Install

First of all, I had to ‘build-up’ the suspension parts. Mainly the camber plates and then mate them to the front coilovers. This was pretty straight forward. I read a few threads about interference between the plate and the struts when deflected. The shaft of the strut isn’t a long as I would have liked.

So, when assembling the plates, I used the 6mm spacers (the ‘step bushing’ in the diagram below) on bottom and top, and an additional 6mm to try get the clearance for strut deflection. Don’t forget to set the bottom spacer in with the dust boot. I also used loctite on all of the nuts and bolts.

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Click the image to open in full size.

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Here’s Rennline’s install instructions borrowed from another thread on RL:

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Yes! There’s two spacers in there! I deflected the struts as far as possible, and they didn’t touch the base of the plate or the dust boot.

Also, that top nut is 26mm deep, so most of the nut is on the thread...

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Some threads that helped me for the rennine plates:
http://rennlist.com/forums/964-forum...er-plates.html
http://rennlist.com/forums/993-forum...questions.html
http://rennlist.com/forums/993-forum...ferrerid=93689

Once that was all assembled, next I had to start getting the old gear out of the car. I found these threads helpful (noting that the are 993, there are some similarities):

http://p-car.com/diy/sus/
http://www.jackals-forge.com/lotus/9...uspension.html

Rear Suspension

I found the rears more difficult than the fronts. In the rear, you have to get the heater blower out on the left side of the car, and the airbox out on the right side of the car.

First you have to undo the rear sway-bar. No need to fiddle with the drop links, just undo the bushed mounts on the body of the car:

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Undoing the top-nuts was a giant pain as they were difficult to access, but got it done..

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Rear Right:
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Rear Left:
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Then undo the bolt going to the trailing arm. This is torqued to 200NM, so you’ll need a long breaker bar:

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That’s it, really. With a bit of patience, it should all come out:

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When you’re putting it all back in, you’ll need another person. Someone down on the ground positioning the strut, and someone up top guiding the top-mount bolts into their respective holes and getting the nuts on. I found lightly putting in the trailing-arm bolt and using a jack to move the whole assembly up was helpful. With a bit of colourful language it is possible. Beware the mono-ball deflecting, making it hard to position the bolts!

In!

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Don’t forget to torque everything up. My torque wrench only goes up to 150NM, so my alignment guy will have to help me out there. I also used nickel anti-seize on all the bolts.

Front Suspension

I found the front’s less difficult, except for dremelling out the brake-line bracket. This was ok, as the old struts were ready for the bin anyway. As with the rear, there aren’t that many bolts. Undo all the cable holders and cut the brake line bracket open to get the line out. The assembly should come out no problem:

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Click the image to open in full size.

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Everything out:

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You might note that I set the suspension at maximum height. Not sure why I did that….but will get to setting the height later…

So, now you transfer the electrical and brake line connections over to the new struts and install:

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Click the image to open in full size.

There was some kind of thick double-sided tape between the old strut tops and the body of the car. When I removed the old suspension, some of it tore away. I added some additional double-sided tape to fill the gaps. I assume this was to prevent NVH and keep junk out of the trunk area…

I tried to match the camber plates. I’m not going to drive the car much until it gets aligned…

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Rinse and repeat for the other side of the car. Then I put on the strut brace. The previous owner installed this stereo amp. I’d like to remove it, but that’s a project for another time. For now, the brace goes nicely between the amp and fuel-tank sender.

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Setting Ride Height

To set the ride height, I looked around for RS specs. There were a few threads, but used this one:

http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsc...my-964-c2.html

Carrera RS spec
V=125mm
H=218mm

ROW Spec
V=165mm
H=258mm

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I basically measured the distance from the floor to those points, then measured the current height setting on the coil-over sleeve. Then I subtracted the amount that would get me those ‘V’ and ‘H’ measurements to get the sleeve height on the strut body. I understand that the suspension would settle, but I assumed that a factory height setting wouldn’t be too crazy. I was wrong. The rear tires were tucking! I double checked this, and in the end, I added 20mm either side on the rears to get a visually equivalent wheel gap front to rear. The car now sits with a slight bit of rake, but it’s not too bad.

Looks the same as before!

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I’ve taken the car around the local suburbs, and the difference is night at day (noting that the alignment still needs to be set). Everything is firmer, the steering is a lot lighter and the turn-in is improved quite a bit. I’m looking forward to the alignment!!

Sparco Seat

For tassie, I’ve temporarily installed a Sparco Evo 2 that has previously served time as my office chair. I’ve owned this seat for years, and it has been in two of my previous minis as well. It’s quite comfortable. I’ve used a generic Recaro runner and the old side-mounts that are with the seat.

I had to drill a new hole in the side-mounts to fit the belt buckle. There is very little space between the seat and the centre tunnel. Everything else was generally predictable:

Lots of spare change under that seat! You’ll note the absence of a spoiler computer, which is a project I’d like to complete this year:

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Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

The standard seat will go back in after the Tassmania trip…
__________________

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Tit + Bec = '09 AB JCW // '90 964 C2 // '15 R60 CCS // Australia
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