motoring|underground  
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Blog

Checkered Flag Track-related discussion, including both racing and high-performance driving events.

Go Back   motoring|underground > The Pits > Checkered Flag
Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 02-08-2006, 06:19 PM
iDiaz's Avatar
iDiaz iDiaz is offline
μ
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: San Marcos, CA
Posts: 15,878
Send a message via AIM to iDiaz
Exclamation BMW Sauber F1 Unveils the F1.06

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.
Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW Press
The BMW Sauber F1.06 takes to the stage.

Although the most important change to the regulations for the 2006 season concerns the engines – down from ten cylinders to eight and 3-litre displacement to 2.4 litres – there are also far-reaching consequences for the chassis construction. The V8 power units are shorter, use less petrol and require a smaller radiator surface, which has a significant effect on the car’s design.

The minimum chassis dimensions stipulated by the FIA ensure that the cars’ overall dimensions will remain almost unchanged. “The more compact engine gives the designers more freedom in the design of the overall car”, explains Willy Rampf, Technical Director at the BMW Sauber F1 Team.

The reduced tank capacity of the BMW Sauber F1.06 influenced both the design of the monocoque and the position of the engine. Added to which, the shorter engine allowed the engineers to extend the length of the 7-speed transmission’s titanium casing. This, in turn, encouraged the construction of a particularly svelte rear end.

Aerodynamics in the spotlight.

Although knowledge gained from the development of the Sauber C24 has not surprisingly found its way into the new car, the BMW Sauber F1.06 is every inch a new design. The engineers focused in particular on aerodynamics, widening their objectives beyond just optimum downforce to enhancing efficiency as well. The construction, arrangement and design of all the car’s sub-assemblies and components were based around these criteria.

The front section of the new car has been given some striking new features. The chassis has been lowered considerably at the front, with the effect that the lower wishbones are no longer attached below the monocoque but to the side of the chassis. The nose of the car has also been lowered further to the ground, with its underside curving upwards slightly. Naturally, the front wing has been modified in line with the other changes through a host of optimisation measures. All of these measures help to optimise the air flow around the aerodynamically critical underbody.

The reduced cooling requirement of the V8 engine allows not only the use of more compact radiators, but also smaller apertures in the sidepods. This also benefits the car’s aerodynamics. The same applies to the rollover bar with integral air intake, which has been reduced in size due to the engine’s lower air throughput. Plus, complex finite-element calculations made it possible to significantly reduce the weight of the rollover bar, while at the same time meeting the stringent safety stipulations.

The shorter engine has allowed the rear end of the BMW Sauber F1.06 to become even leaner and more harmonious, ensuring optimum air flow over the rear wing. The exhaust tailpipes have been moved further back from their location on the C24. The engineers used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to position them in such a way that the hot exhaust gases are channelled around structural components such as the rear suspension and rear wing in the most efficient way possible.

The development of the rear wing will be a significantly higher priority during the coming season. “Last year we started most races with maximum downforce”, explains Rampf. “The high output of the 3-litre engines meant that drag did not play a dominant role at many circuits.” That has now changed fundamentally. The 20-percent reduction in engine displacement means the team will be looking at making compromises at many more circuits when it comes to downforce and drag. Whereas in 2005 the team used three basic rear wings for high, medium and low downforce, this year there will be a greater number of variants. “If we’re also looking to achieve the top speed which we’ve calculated as a target, there will only be a few tracks where we can still run with maximum downforce”, says Rampf. And that means aerodynamic development work will focus far more closely than in the past on the development of finely graded rear wing variants.

New design for the suspension.

A totally new feature of the BMW Sauber F1.06 is the design of the front and rear suspension. On the front axle, the layout is influenced significantly by the higher attachment points of the lower wishbones, which reflect the focus on aerodynamics. The rear axle is also a new construction. Here, modified kinematics aimed at responding better to the Michelin tyres were at the centre of the engineers’ considerations. As Rampf confirms, “The new rear suspension geometry will allow us to exploit the potential of the Michelin tyres much more effectively.”

Lowering the front section also allows the assembly position of the pedals and inboard front-axle components to drop by a similar degree, as well as ensuring a lower position for the driver’s legs. All these factors help to bring down the car’s centre of gravity.

“Our declared aim in the medium term is to close the gap on the leading teams. The BMW Sauber F1.06 represents our first step in that direction”, says Rampf of the team’s objectives.

The BMW P86.

Revolution, not evolution: the Formula One World Championship will not just be welcoming new engines to the fray in 2006, but a whole new generation of engines. Thanks to a change on the regulations, the new V8 units with 2.4-litre displacement replace the 3.0-litre V10 powerplants which ruled the roost last year. Heinz Paschen, the Munich-based Technical Director responsible for the entire powertrain of the new F1 car, gives us a glimpse of what to expect: “The new V8 engines are shorter and, with displacement reduced by 600 cc, have lower output and fuel consumption. However, they are no lighter, cheaper or less complex than their ten-cylinder predecessors.”

An all-new concept.

Although the V8 with the now compulsory cylinder angle of 90 degrees may look like a sawn-off V10, technically it is an entirely separate concept with its own specific characteristics. The V8 has a distinct firing sequence and requires a fundamentally different crankshaft design. Whereas a 72-degree offset crankshaft was used in BMW’s V10 Formula One engine, V8 powerplants can feature crankshafts with either four throws spaced at 90 degrees or four throws spaced at 180 degrees.

Standard production cars are fitted with 90-degree crankshaft variants due to their better dynamic attributes, but a 180-degree crankshaft is favoured in racing-car engine design. The improved performance this allows offsets the disadvantages in terms of dynamics.

As a rule, we can expect the new V8 engines to have around 20 percent less power than their V10 predecessors and 20-percent smaller radiators – both reduced in proportion to the lower displacement.

Two cylinders are fired.

In addition to the inherent differences in the design of a V8 engine, numerous other specification details contained in the new regulations have sent the engineers back to the drawing board.

Lightweight construction principles have taken centre stage. The new V8 has to be heavier than its predecessor, even through the 2005 engine had two extra cylinders. This season’s powerplants must tip the scales at no less than 95 kilograms. This should include the intake system up to and including the air filter, fuel rail and injectors, ignition coils, sensors and wiring, alternator, coolant pumps and oil pumps. It does not include liquids, exhaust manifolds, heat protection shields, oil tanks, accumulators, heat exchangers and hydraulic pump.

Added to which, the new regulations stipulate that the engine’s centre of gravity must be at least 165 millimetres above the lower edge of the oil sump. The experts had previously managed to lower the ten-cylinder engine’s centre of gravity to the benefit of the car’s handling. However, the longitudinal and lateral position of the V8’s centre of gravity has to be in the geometric centre of the engine (+/–50 millimetres). For the technical commission, checking that everything is in order no longer consists of a simple weighing process. Now, making sure that the rules have been observed involves weighing on two levels and making calculations according to the lever principle.

Previously a closely guarded secret, the dimensions of the cylinder bore are now limited to a maximum 98 millimetres. The gap between the cylinders is also set out in the rulebook – at 106.5 millimetres (+/– 0.2 mm). The central axis of the crankshaft must not lie any less than 58 millimetres above the reference plane.

Farewell to variable intake systems.

Another critical change in the regulations is the ban on variable intake systems. Known as “trumpets”, these systems could previously be used to optimise the car’s torque curve. The fixed duct lengths will now make achieving good engine driveability a more exacting challenge. “The teams will have to devote a lot more time and effort to this area”, confirms Paschen. “We have to strike a compromise between maximum power and good driveability.” Where the best compromise for the pipe lengths is to be found depends on various factors. The track layout and the weather, for example, both play a role. The teams will favour one set of intake pipe lengths for circuits with long straights – like Monza, Indianapolis and Spa – where power is critical, and a different selection for twistier grand prix tracks such as Budapest and Monaco, where driveability relegates raw power to the back seat. The same applies to different weather conditions. Joining variable intake systems on the black list are variable exhaust systems and variable valve control systems.

The power supply to the engine electrics and electronics is limited to a maximum 17 volts and the fuel pump now has to be mechanically operated. Only an actuator may now be used to activate the throttle valve system.

With the exception of the electric auxiliary pumps in the petrol tank, all sub-components must now be driven mechanically and directly via the engine.

“Sensibly, a long list of exotic materials have been excluded”, says Paschen in reference to another chapter of the regulations. “Now we are all working with the conventional titanium and aluminium alloys stipulated in the regulations.”

That means there are now fewer differences in the technical make-up of the various manufacturers’ engines. However, this does not mean that the challenge for the engineers has been in any way diluted. As Paschen explains: “It’s all about who can find the best solution within the framework of the new rules in terms of thermodynamics and mechanical dynamics.”

Indeed, mechanical dynamics and vibrations represent a particularly critical area of development for the new generation of Formula One engines.

The V8 units have different firing sequences and intervals from their V10 predecessors, which leads to a totally different situation in terms of vibrations. The V10 entered a critical area between 12,000 rpm and 14,000 rpm. However, this was not an issue as the engine did not spend much time in this rev band and smoothed itself out again once the driver stepped up the revs. And, since the upper rev band was where it spent the majority of its time, vibrations were not a worry. A V8, on the other hand, is not so well off. Its vibration curve enters critical territory later than the V10 – from approximately 16,000 rpm – and continues to climb from there.

It’s therefore no longer possible to think in terms of getting through a difficult patch and everything will be all right. Now, the problem of constantly increasing vibrations has to be confronted head on. “If you don’t get a handle on vibrations”, says Paschen, “they will eat into the service life of the engine and multiply the loads exerted on chassis components. In order to get on top of this problem, the calculation and analysis of each individual engine component has to be totally reliable. However, analysis of the individual components is only part of a larger challenge. Determining how they work with and against each other in simulations of the overall system is the main task.”

Regarding the costs involved in the changeover from V10 to V8, Paschen pulls no punches: “The manufacturers had a deep well of experience with the V10 concept and that helped to keep development costs down. The expense involved in developing a whole new unit, though, is huge. At least in the initial development phase for the V8, a relatively small reduction in cylinders has meant a relatively large hike in costs.”
__________________
Click the image to open in full size.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-08-2006, 08:59 PM
Lucky13's Avatar
Lucky13 Lucky13 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: 805 ventura cali
Posts: 3,564
Send a message via AIM to Lucky13
Default



i need to change my panties thanks a lot =)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-08-2006, 09:49 PM
iDiaz's Avatar
iDiaz iDiaz is offline
μ
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: San Marcos, CA
Posts: 15,878
Send a message via AIM to iDiaz
Default

Yeah, it's effin' sexy. I must say though, I think the Williams FW27 was a sexier looking machine. What is cool is that BMW Sauber F1 tied in this new machine with the Formula BMW car:

Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.
__________________
Click the image to open in full size.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-08-2006, 11:08 PM
Lucky13's Avatar
Lucky13 Lucky13 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: 805 ventura cali
Posts: 3,564
Send a message via AIM to Lucky13
Default

i like how its' mostly white
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


CURRENT MOON

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:18 AM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
©2005 motoring|underground, all rights reserved.