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  #61  
Old 01-03-2013, 05:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Pir8 97 View Post
New Christmas present from my wonderful wife: Garmin 210 with heart rate monitor and foot pod. Time to get serious about this training. Now I can set my training by heart rate & cadence. I looked up some training today and was a little disappointed that I may be training a bit above my ability. I hate the idea of having to slow down, but if it makes me faster in the long run then so be it. I'm going to try some max heart rate tests to try and get a true max heart rate.

Here's a pic from yesterday's 5 mile test run:

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The run went well, but I hurt my foot yesterday afternoon. My kids got new bikes & I was running beside them. Don't know what I did... Maybe I was tight after the early run & pulled something. Hope it'll go away soon without more drama.
We use Strava for logging. Wife logs both running and biking, me, just biking. She has the Garmin 305, I use the 500. She still wants the foot pod.
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  #62  
Old 01-21-2013, 04:33 PM
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Did my second half marathon yesterday with the wifey. Bettered our last time by 14 minutes. My goal was 3 hours even, and came in at 3:07, so pretty close. Didn't train nearly enough, but pretty happy with our time. Hoping to better it by another 30 minutes next time with some proper training.

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  #63  
Old 04-16-2013, 08:52 PM
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Anyone hear from Dave? I don't know if he was able to run Boston due to his foot injury.
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  #64  
Old 04-17-2013, 05:30 AM
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Well after looking into this heart rate thing further, maybe I am training in the proper zones at least for tempo. The calculators had my MHR around 181-186. Well I ran 5 miles yesterday with a kick in the last .25 mi. My monitor had my max at 194bpm so that's what I'm going with for my MHR.
that sounds right, and a good run
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  #65  
Old 04-17-2013, 01:56 PM
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that sounds right, and a good run
Speaking of MHR, I ran a 5k a few weeks ago and peaked at 204 BPM. It hung around 200+ for the last 1/2 mile. Not sure if it was about to explode or if I can handle higher heart rates than someone my age should be able to endure.
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  #66  
Old 04-17-2013, 09:03 PM
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Speaking of MHR, I ran a 5k a few weeks ago and peaked at 204 BPM. It hung around 200+ for the last 1/2 mile. Not sure if it was about to explode or if I can handle higher heart rates than someone my age should be able to endure.
I've gone over the standardized "age related MHR" a few times, I don't think its that you can't get there, I think it is that your heart probably wont be functioning as it should with oxygen. I know that I get really tunnel visioned around the 200 range and fatigue much worse. That only happens to me if I have stopped working out for a few weeks and try to come back at my normal pace. Most people I know have pushed that high with similar results so I have come to the conclusion that its not that your heart isn't able, your just either not operating efficiently and not getting the oxygen you need at that point.

It would be worthwhile to get your oxygen levels exc checked out to see what YOU are peronally capable of. everyones anerobic tolerances are different. also remember that too much sustained aerobic steady paced conditioning can mess with your thyroid. Need to throw in some HIIT stuff as well if you are not.
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  #67  
Old 04-18-2013, 03:49 AM
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Everyone will perform at and have different HRs, HR zones, and MHRs. The formula of 220 minus your age can pretty much only be counted on to be inaccurate for nearly anyone that is active. According to the formula, my MHR is 180 (I am 40 years old, ). However, I routinely hit the upper 180s to low 190s when cycling. And I have done sustained climbs with my HR in the mid 180s without any issues. Just this past Sunday I rode a 1.8 mile climb with an average HR of 184 for nearly 8:30.

The best way to get a true reading of your MHR is to have a VO2 max test done. After you accurately know your MHR you can set your HR zones and train more effectively.

As far as you peaking at 204, that could be anything from your actual HR to some sort of electrical interference. The zippers on cycling jerseys can mess with a HR monitor, a poor 'connection' between the monitor and your heart or if the monitor is not paired with your computer (watch) before you start working out. I have had all those happen to me and I see spikes as high as the 280s. Clearly that is not accurate and it usually happens right at the beginning of a ride. To alleviate these issues I rub a little spit on the pads on the strap, I wear a synthetic base-layer and I try to make sure the monitor is paired with my computer prior to rolling.

Are you on Strava? You can look at other people's HRs but you can't really compare yours to theirs.

I ride with a guy that is about 10 years older than me and his MHR is around 165-170. We can do a ride together and my average HR will be near his MHR but neither of us is any more "worked" than the other. We literally ride the same distance, speed, time and we are close to the same build/weight.

Heart rates are like snowflakes or fingerprints.
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  #68  
Old 04-19-2013, 03:41 PM
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It would be worthwhile to get your oxygen levels exc checked out to see what YOU are peronally capable of. everyones anerobic tolerances are different. also remember that too much sustained aerobic steady paced conditioning can mess with your thyroid. Need to throw in some HIIT stuff as well if you are not.
Good to know I hate interval training, but I know I need to do it.

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As far as you peaking at 204, that could be anything from your actual HR to some sort of electrical interference. The zippers on cycling jerseys can mess with a HR monitor, a poor 'connection' between the monitor and your heart or if the monitor is not paired with your computer (watch) before you start working out. I have had all those happen to me and I see spikes as high as the 280s. Clearly that is not accurate and it usually happens right at the beginning of a ride. To alleviate these issues I rub a little spit on the pads on the strap, I wear a synthetic base-layer and I try to make sure the monitor is paired with my computer prior to rolling.
I use water or spit on the contact points when I put on the HRM. I was wearing a tech jersey that particular morning. I watched my HR climb throughout the race, so it seems reasonable. On recovery runs I stay in the upper 160s - low 170s. A typical run is in the upper 170s to l mid 180s. Again, this is distance running and not terribly fast. The speed I ran that 5k was considerably faster than my typical training pace. I prefer long slow runs to these short fast runs and hadn't done any speed training in about 7 months.

I just read about a guy that died at the finish line of a local 5k on Saturday. I probably do need a VO2 max test so I know my limits and don't end up like that guy.

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Are you on Strava? You can look at other people's HRs but you can't really compare yours to theirs.
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  #69  
Old 04-19-2013, 04:06 PM
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My guess is something else was going on with that guy like an arrythmia. If your worries about that a dr can check that too to see if everything is sinus. Sprints count as hiit so maybe just throw some into your routine
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  #70  
Old 04-19-2013, 04:19 PM
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My guess is something else was going on with that guy like an arrythmia. If your worries about that a dr can check that too to see if everything is sinus. Sprints count as hiit so maybe just throw some into your routine
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  #71  
Old 04-20-2013, 03:19 AM
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I just read about a guy that died at the finish line of a local 5k on Saturday. I probably do need a VO2 max test so I know my limits and don't end up like that guy.
Like Justin said, there was most likely an underlying issue. You may work so hard that you think your heart will stop, give out, etc. but you wouldn't normally just up and die. Other things would happen first to prevent you from dying. Your body will do damn-near anything it can to stay alive and that normally includes not allowing you to work to death.

Read this infographic about HIIT: http://www.active.com/fitness/Articl...88381481237582
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  #72  
Old 04-20-2013, 06:02 AM
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like chip said you will start having REALLY negative side effects if your excersizing at above or even at your MHR for too long... You will feel faint, tunnel visioned and your muscles will break down a lot faster... if you manage to keep going after that you probably will pass out lol.... that said its not really good to be over 85% or so of your mhr very often. That said in highschool my coaches use to say if we could drive home after practice we didn't push hard enough.. and often times I couldnt for a while. I wouldn't worry too much, but if you do... go get a stress test done. My resting heart rate is really low. low 40's and it freaked my parents out so I got to do a bunch of testing. Also the older you get they say the 220-age deal starts to get way less accurate.

also you have been doing this long enough that unless your really changing stuff up it would be really hard to be getting your heart rate up to dangerous levels unless your pushing really hard...
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Old 04-20-2013, 06:11 AM
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thats an awesome infographic


also my roommate is a trainer for a collegiate girls basketball team. He recently helped a girl who had chest pains and a bad arrhythmia that she was ignoring because she was afraid of being benched. Had she not come clean she would have died. So athletes that drop dead typically know they have a problem.
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  #74  
Old 04-21-2013, 11:27 PM
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Note: I wrote this up before the suspects were identified and tracked down. My focus here is mainly on my race at the Boston Marathon.



Cliff Notes:
  • Qualified at O.C. Marathon in 2:49 in May 2012
  • Hip Injury in June 2012
  • Stress Fracture in September 2012
  • 1st run post stress fracture - Late December
  • Boston Goals in December - Show up. Don't get hurt.
  • Cross Training - cycling 2-3 days a week, running 3 days a week - focused on the long run and focused on speed.
  • Boston Goals in April - Don't get hurt. Go Sub 3!
Click the image to open in full size.

Background

My Boston Qualifying race was the O.C. Marathon in May 2012. I ran a 2:49:29. The first 20 in 2:01:22 (6:06/mile), the last 10k in 48 minutes (~7:30/mile). I walked 10-12 times in the last 10k. While the overall time was fast, I failed miserably at correct pacing and paid the price. Lesson Learned!

That June, I got a hip injury after crashing at the bottom of staircase in a trail race. So 2 months sidelined for that. I ran for a couple months, then got injured again in September with a stress fracture in my left foot. I was sidelined for 3.5 months with that injury.

I wore that boot from September through Christmas. My first run back was just before New Years. At that point, I only really thought it was realistic to run part of the Boston Marathon and then have someone meet me with the boot to go the rest of the way in the brace. I was thinking I could probably work up to running 10-14 miles in the first couple hours, and then have 4 hours to finish off the rest of the distance in the boot. That was early January.

Click the image to open in full size.

Unlike my two prior marathon training cycles where I ran peak mileage of between 60-80 miles a week, this time I had 2-3 days/week of cycling and swimming mixed in, so my running mileage never topped out over 40 miles/week. With trying to work in non impact activity, it made it difficult at times to feel confident I was putting in all of the work I could for a great performance com mid April. As a result, along the way I tried to do what I could to keep my expectations in check.

March was my breakthrough month in a lot of respects. Running wise, I was finally starting to feel like my form was coming back. Weight wise, by the end of March I had lost 20 lbs that I had gained during my sedentary time recovering from the stress fracture.


So, I was starting to feel pretty good at this point that I could hold a pace for a Sub 3 time at Boston. The only thing I wasn't confident of was holding that pace on the hills of Newton and Boston.

Marathon Monday

I got to the Boston Commons about 6 AM to catch the bus out to the start. I arrived at Hopkinton (start town) at a little after 7 AM. The weather forecast for the day was a high temp in the mid to upper 50's. My qualifying time got me into Wave 1, Corral #2, which meant I started at 10 AM. So I had 3 hours to kill at the school in Hopkinton.


The Race:
We started off at 10 AM. With where I was at in Wave 1, we were running sub 7:00 min/miles from the start. We were also 10-12 people wide across the full width of the road for the next 26.2 miles. During the first two miles I clipped feet with the runner or runners behind me on 4 or 5 occasions. This was the scariest part of the race for me. I felt briefly like I was a risk that I could clip feet, trip, and then get trampled. Fortunately things got spread out enough after the first couple miles that I never got clipped again. That said we remained 10 wide for the full race distance.

I know now I underestimated the downhill grade at the start. That said, my race goals were to #1 DON'T GET HURT (ref: hip injury and stress fracture in the 2nd half of 2012), #2: run an evenly paced race, go Sub 3 if possible.

Splits:
  • 5k - 20:50 - avg pace 6:43/mi - doing what I can here just to stay upright and hold back on the downhill
  • 10k - 41:37 - avg pace 6:43/mi - still trying to hold back
  • 15k - 1:02:22 - avg pace 6:42/mi - eye on the ball
  • 20k - 1:23:03 - avg pace 6:42/mi
  • Half Marathon - 1:27:33 - avg pace 6:41/mi - about a minute ahead of my goal at this point. Feeling pretty good and happy not to have gotten carried away on the down hill.
  • 25k - 1:44:30 - avg pace 6:45/mi
  • 30k - 2:05:21 - avg pace 6:44/mi - the hills of Newton
  • 35k - 2:26:15 - avg pace 6:44/mi - included Heartbreak Hill
  • 40k - 2:47:09 - avg pace 6:44/mi - running down Beacon St
  • Finish - 2:57:03 - avg pace 6:45/mi (finished in the top 10% of the field)
I was very happy to finally have a nice consistent pace in a full marathon. Both of my prior full marathons were faster, but my pacing was totally off. I basically blew through 20 miles and then suffered the last 10k. This time I felt strong at the end and didn't walk. That was a first for me in a full marathon. Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.
Things I'll remember about the race: running 10 wide for the full 26.2 miles, having spectators 3-4 deep most of the way, the large number of law enforcement providing crowd control on the course, the scream tunnel, and the final turn on Boylston and how far away the finish still seemed. Overall I was very impressed with the race and I will do it again.

I finished around 1 PM. By 2:50 PM when the explosions occurred, I had already collected my stuff, reunited with my family, gone to my hotel near Copley, showered, and we were a few miles away on our way to lunch. Ultimately my experience of the attack on the Boston Marathon was fairly unremarkable in terms of the events around the bombing. I found out about the attack in largely the same way that a lot of Americans did via the TV at the restaurant.

My firm belief is that whoever did this grossly underestimated the meaning of the marathon to Boston and the citizens of Boston. This attack is only going to increase resolve to come out for the 2014 race in droves. The security posture may differ in places, but I am confident Patriots Day will once again see large crowds both along course and running.

That said, I BQ'd with a time that was nearly 18:00 minutes faster than the qualifying standard. I intend to put that time to good use and return in 2014 for the 118th Boston Marathon.
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Last edited by Dave; 04-22-2013 at 01:43 AM..
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  #75  
Old 04-22-2013, 12:25 AM
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outstanding man! your hauling! will you continue cross training the same amount?
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