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  #1  
Old 11-03-2006, 05:53 PM
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Lightbulb Tools and Techniques!

This thread is for posting tools/techniques you use for performing maintenence on your ride. It is also a place to post tools/techniques that don't work so well.

As this thread grows the data will be incorporated into the site (yes the site is on its way) giving credit to those who post good info.

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  #2  
Old 11-03-2006, 05:56 PM
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Awesome Idea!!!!!!!...............
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Old 11-03-2006, 06:04 PM
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Tools...a good torque wrench and socket set is always a must! And a nice low profile jack for us who owned slammed Mini's

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  #4  
Old 11-03-2006, 06:11 PM
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you should post the link of "how to beat the shit out of your door when the window doesn't work" in here.
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  #5  
Old 11-03-2006, 07:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RFIbanez
Tools...a good torque wrench and socket set is always a must! And a nice low profile jack for us who owned slammed Mini's
I have always used a dial torque wrench, but the one I have is ubber expensive (I got it cheap while in the Navy).

Here is one on Amazon that isn't too expensive.

Dial Torque Wrench
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Old 11-03-2006, 07:21 PM
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Rear brake calipers: If you're too cheap to buy the brake caliper tool to push the pistons in, use a big C-clamp. The piston has to turn as it rotates (think of it as a large bolt), so put the C-clamp on it with the threaded shaft part on the piston face (taking care not to damage the rubber boot) and the clamp body on the back of the caliper. Turn it until it tightens up a bit, then slowly work it tighter until the swivel head on the C-clamp binds up. If you feel like you're applying too much force, back it off a little, then try again. With a little bit of finesse, the piston should begin to turn and compress, loosening the clamp and allowing the head to swivel again. Tighten it up again, and it should bind up and turn the piston more easily. Continue this until the piston is fully pushed in, being careful to guide the rubber boot in around the piston without letting it get bunched up.
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Old 11-03-2006, 07:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iDiaz
Rear brake calipers: If you're too cheap to buy the brake caliper tool to push the pistons in, use a big C-clamp. The piston has to turn as it rotates (think of it as a large bolt), so put the C-clamp on it with the threaded shaft part on the piston face (taking care not to damage the rubber boot) and the clamp body on the back of the caliper. Turn it until it tightens up a bit, then slowly work it tighter until the swivel head on the C-clamp binds up. If you feel like you're applying too much force, back it off a little, then try again. With a little bit of finesse, the piston should begin to turn and compress, loosening the clamp and allowing the head to swivel again. Tighten it up again, and it should bind up and turn the piston more easily. Continue this until the piston is fully pushed in, being careful to guide the rubber boot in around the piston without letting it get bunched up.
I actually did this today before work. One thing to add is I had some issues. The left one seemed to be stuck. So I left the C-Clamp on there for a bit then loosened and let it sit for a moment and then tried again and it unstuck and went in smooth. The right one would go in some then stop. I would loosen the C-Clamp an let is sit for a min then tighten up again and it would go in smooth.

I also noted that the right caliper piston dust cover was torn to shreds! I am sure this was done by the dealer since they did the brakes last. They probably let the dust cover twist and then it tore or something.

Also be careful not to pinch the dust cover with the pad... I noticed that my dust cover wanted to kinda bunch up over the piston.

Anyway... it all went smooth. Just had to have patience.
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Old 11-03-2006, 07:32 PM
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Ah, that sucks! I wonder how much a rebuild kit costs. Bruiser?
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Old 11-03-2006, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iDiaz
Ah, that sucks! I wonder how much a rebuild kit costs. Bruiser?
for the rear calipers..................?..............as of now, there is NO repair kit availible........sorry....calipers are only replacable in pairs.....
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  #10  
Old 11-03-2006, 07:38 PM
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you can just buy the dust cover and replace it. I doubt there is any damage, but if that piston gets dirty it is probably gonna stick. I cleaned off the piston prior to compressing and will replace the dust cover this weekend.
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Old 11-03-2006, 07:41 PM
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Ummm.... a T-30 Torx bit is used to take lots of things apart on the Mini.
-G
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  #12  
Old 11-03-2006, 07:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polyclef
you can just buy the dust cover and replace it. I doubt there is any damage, but if that piston gets dirty it is probably gonna stick. I cleaned off the piston prior to compressing and will replace the dust cover this weekend.
dust cover is replacable 34 21 6 757 250......
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Old 11-03-2006, 07:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplygriff
Ummm.... a T-30 Torx bit is used to take lots of things apart on the Mini.
-G
along with a 10mm, 13mm, and 17mm...........
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  #14  
Old 11-03-2006, 07:44 PM
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A set of Hex Head sockets is nice too. 7mm for brakes calipers. Can't really do proper torque with an allen wrench
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  #15  
Old 11-03-2006, 07:57 PM
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I use a Husky torque wrench... It was about $80 at Home Depot... Works well.
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